What is This Whole Ortho-tain Thing You Keep Talking About?

shutterstock_210060295Wondering what this whole Ortho-tain thing is I keep mentioning? Well here is everything thing you need to know!

My Experience:
For the past three years of my 13 years of experience as a dentist, I am truly stunned by the results of the Ortho-tain appliance and am so excited to share it with the public. The Ortho-tain appliance can effectively prevent the need for orthodontics and straighten young smiles as early as possible. The best part about this appliance though is that it actually works!

So what exactly is this amazing product?
Ortho-tain is a mouthguard appliance that can straighten your teeth without brackets and wires. It is generally worn for just a few hours a day. It also gradually guides your child’s teeth in the correct position before severe crowding, unlike braces which mainly correct crowding.

Why have I never heard of it then?
The appliance has actually been around since the 1970’s but does not garner as much of a profit as braces do. I have actually had the pleasure of meeting with the Otho-tain creator, Dr. Earl Bergerson, a humble and caring orthodontist. He is very passionate about this product and is excited for it to increase the growth and development of oral health.

Will Ortho-tain work on young children?
I have placed the Ortho-tain appliance on children as young as 5 and 6 years old. It is actually ideal to start children on this appliance young because it guides the teeth into the correct placing, corrects cross-bites, overbites, and deep-bites, avoiding the need for costly braces.

Can I afford Ortho-tain?
Oh yes! This appliance is actually 1/3 to 1/2 the cost of traditional orthodontics.

Will my child need a retainer after treatment like they will after braces?
Nope! Your teeth are connected to your jawbones with a periodontal ligament. With normal braces, we wait for the adult teeth to come in crooked and twisted (after the ligaments are set), and then they must be untwisted. The ligaments are like rubber bands and they want to move back to where they were. This is a relapse and this is the reason people get braces over and over again. With Ortho-tain, the appliance actually guides teeth straight as the erupt in the first place, and the ligaments form and end up exactly where they need to be. It’s the most remarkable thing about the appliance!

Interested now that you know a little more about this amazing product, or maybe you’re still a little skeptical even? That’s alright, give me a call at (907) 276-5522 and I would love to tell you more about it and answer all your questions.

Harmful Dental Habits to Avoid

dentist AnchorageThe simplest of bad dental habits can have a profound effect on teeth and overall jaw functioning. Some bad habits can easily be spotted at checkups and cleanings by a dentist. Patients can take steps to rid themselves of these harmful behaviors for better dental checkups and a better, healthier smile.

  • Oral hygiene habits: Insufficient or inefficient flossing, brushing teeth too hard, or simply not brushing correctly and at least twice a day can all contribute to increased bacteria in the mouth, more prominent staining of teeth, and inflammation or irritation of the gums, as well as risk of damage to enamel and increased risk of cavities. It is equally important to maintain regular dental checkups and cleanings.
  • Too much sugar and/or acidic foods and beverages: Soft drinks, sodas, sports drinks, juice, coffee, tea, and almost any beverage that isn’t pure water can be quite acidic and acid weakens tooth enamel leaving teeth more susceptible to bacteria and dental decay. Diet beverages are just as acidic, if not more depending on the type of sweetener used instead of sugar.
  • Chewing ice, popcorn kernels, and hard candy: Chewing on hard candy and popcorn kernels can put tremendous pressure on teeth, especially teeth with large fillings. Chewing on ice also puts pressure on teeth, but with the added factor of extreme cold that increases risk of damage.
  • Chewing on anything that isn’t food: Chewing on non-food items such as paper, pens, pencils, paperclips, toothpicks, and other items increases risk of damage to teeth as well as the added risk of transferring bacteria from the object. Nails are not food and underneath the nails live a variety of bacteria that should not enter the mouth.
  • Grinding or clenching teeth: As with chewing on non-food or hard items, grinding or clenching teeth puts undue pressure on the teeth. A lot of grinding and clenching behaviors occur subconsciously such as during sleep, and in such cases a night guard can be worn to reduce damage.
  • Improper use of teeth: Using teeth for anything but their natural intended use (i.e. chewing and speaking) should be considered bad. Teeth are not meant to be used as tools to open bottles, break plastic wrapping or tear open packages, and teeth are not meant to hold items such as flashlights, pens, or other items.

As with most habits, a minimum of 28 days is usually required to break the habitual behavior or to form a good, healthy habit. Contact the office of Dr. Owen C. Mandanas at 907-276-5522 today for more information about good and bad dental habits and making positive changes for a healthier smile.