Foods That Naturally Strengthen Children's Teeth

7 Foods That Naturally Strengthen Your Child’s Teeth

Many dentists are quick to talk about the foods that we should avoid feeding our children if we want them to have healthy teeth. We are given lists of “no-no foods” to post on our fridge doors, including the likes of candy, soda, sugar, etc. These lists are helpful, but what if we want to take a more proactive approach? What are the foods that naturally promote healthy teeth in our children? Check out our list of 7 foods that do just that!

1. Water

Okay, water is a drink, not a food, but it is a drink that works wonders when it comes to naturally strengthening your child’s teeth! Water is the primary ingredient in saliva, which contains calcium and phosphorous. Both of these minerals are used by the body to rebuild enamel and teeth-supporting bone structures. Saliva is also a natural rinsing agent, loosening plaque and hydrating gums. Finally, saliva increases the number of natural, bacteria-fighting antibodies in the mouth and neutralizes damage-causing acid. Increase your child’s water intake to increase saliva production and reap these benefits for their teeth!

2. Raw, High-Fiber Veggies

Crunchy and stringy veggies naturally scrub plaque from teeth when chewed. Next time your child is looking for a quick snack, give them some celery or carrot sticks, broccoli or cauliflower, green beans or snap peas!

3. Protein/Mineral-Rich Foods

Foods that are high in vitamins A, C and D, calcium and phosphorous are good for your child’s teeth. Vitamins A and C fight gingivitis-causing bacteria. Vitamin D helps the body use calcium and phosphorous which are building blocks for healthy teeth. Calcium also raises the pH level in your child’s mouth, reducing acid, which eats away at your child’s enamel. Foods that contain these minerals include protein-rich beef, poultry, fish, eggs, tofu and beans as well as potatoes, spinach, other leafy greens and whole grains. Next time you are making dinner for your child, look for recipes that contain these natural ingredients!

4. Nuts & Seeds

Nuts and seeds are also vitamin and mineral rich, including vitamin D and calcium. They also contain natural fats and oils that coat your child’s teeth, shielding them against bacteria and strengthening their enamel, making them resistant to cavities. Pack trail mix for your child wherever you go to take advantage of the teeth-strengthening power of nuts and seeds!

5. Vitamin C-Rich Foods

Vitamin C fights the bacteria in the mouth that convert sugar to damage-causing acid. Vitamin C-rich foods include oranges, limes, kiwis, strawberries, papaya, cantaloupe, peppers, tomatoes and sweet potatoes to name a few. Many of these foods are also acid-rich, so exercise caution and choose lower-acidity vitamin C-rich foods for your child.

6. Dairy Products

Dairy products such as milk, cheese and yogurt are high in calcium, vitamin D and phosphorous. As we have already learned, these vitamins and minerals strengthen your child’s teeth and raise the pH level in their mouth, lowering acid levels and protecting their enamel. Dairy products also promote saliva production!

7. Sugarless Gum

Gum is typically not recommended by dentists because of its high sugar content, but sugarless gum is different! Not only does sugarless gum stimulate saliva production and naturally scrub your child’s teeth like veggies do, but many brands of sugarless gum contain a natural sweetener called Xylitol. This natural sweetener fights tooth decay-causing bacteria in your child’s mouth.

Incorporate these 7 foods in your child’s diet to strengthen their teeth! If you would like to talk to a dentist about more ways to naturally promote healthy teeth in your children, contact Dr. Owen Mandanas. Dr. Mandanas is an integrative dentist who will look at the whole picture of your child’s health to better take care of their mouth.

Tongue Positioning: What It Is and How It Helps

Tongue Positioning: What It Is and How It Helps

You may have recently heard your dentist mention “tongue posture” or “tongue positioning,” wondering: “What on earth is that? Why have I never heard of it before?” Well, just like we practice good sitting and standing posture for the sake of our necks and backs, we can practice good tongue posture for the sake of our mouth. In fact, the position of your tongue impacts the nose, the eyes, the head, the neck and shoulders too! As many as 50% of people have incorrect tongue posture and a growing number of dentists and orthodontists have started addressing this problem head on. Learn more about the negative impacts of improper tongue positioning, how to position your tongue correctly, and more below.

Proper Tongue Positioning

So what is the right way to hold your tongue? Let’s start with the wrong way first.

For a lot of people, their tongue rests at the bottom of the mouth, pushing against the bottom teeth. Is this you? If so, you have improper tongue positioning. Don’t be alarmed–As we mentioned earlier, almost half of the population on earth is in the same boat.

Proper tongue positioning is where the tongue rests at the top of the mouth, sitting about 1/2 inch behind the front teeth. Your entire tongue (including the back) should be pressing against the roof of the mouth, your lips should be sealed and your teeth should rest slightly apart. You don’t want any pressure on your bottom or top front teeth. Even the slightest pressure over time will move them (this is how orthodontics works!). It is important that the entire tongue presses against the roof of the mouth–Over time this can expand the palate, preventing the crowding of your teeth and opening up your sinuses.

Signs and Symptoms of Improper Tongue Positioning

The tongue is a powerful muscle, impacting many parts of the body beyond the mouth. As we mentioned earlier, tongue positioning can even affect the sinuses. Here are some signs and symptoms that could indicate improper tongue positioning:

  • Improper Swallowing – When swallowing, your tongue should move up and back like a wave moving the food toward the back of your throat, not forward and down (this is called tongue thrusting). Tongue thrusting negatively affects the shape of your teeth and jaw.
  • Snoring and Sleep Apnea – Again, your palate is connected to the sinuses. If by improper tongue positioning your palate has narrowed, your sinuses may narrow, creating complications for your breathing.
  • Vision Problems – The palate is connected to your eye sockets as well as your sinuses, impacting how your eyes rest in your head. If the palate misshapen is due to improper tongue positioning, your eyes will not be positioned properly.
  • Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction (better known as TMJ) – If you have had orthodontic work, chances are you have TMJ, especially if your orthodontist does not take a holistic approach to your teeth. TMJ is where the jaw is slightly out of alignment, causing inflammation and pain at the hinge. Orthodontic work should consider tongue positioning and how their work on the teeth affects the jaw along with the rest of the body.
  • Crowded Teeth
  • Gap in the Front Teeth
  • Dysfunctional Bite – Overbite, underbite or crossbite.
  • Teeth Grinding
  • Tooth Decay
  • Recessed Chin
  • Longer, Flatter Face Shape
  • Forward Thrust of the Head – Where the head is thrust forward and chin is lifted. Our heads are meant to sit back with our chins tucked under. Anything else and we begin to experience neck pain.
  • Neck and Shoulder Tension and Pain
  • Headaches

Benefits of Proper Tongue Positioning

What are the benefits of holding your tongue the right way? Avoiding all of the uncomfortable symptoms of improper tongue posture! We’ve broken these benefits down into four categories:

  • Look Better – That’s right! Proper tongue positioning leads to a more attractive face with higher cheekbones and a stronger jawline because the muscles in your mouth are where they are supposed to be. People who hold their tongue correctly are also less likely to have crowded, crooked teeth.
  • Feel Better – When your tongue is in the right place, you can have a healthy bite, no jaw pain, neck pain or headaches.
  • Breath Better
  • Sleep Better

Tongue Positioning Exercises

Take advantage of the benefits of proper tongue positioning with these exercises!

The first exercise helps you get an idea of the shape of your mouth as well as where your tongue should be. Start by feeling the back of your teeth with the tip of your tongue. Now slide the tip back to the flat area just behind your teeth, then to the bumpy, ridged area behind that. You will notice that the roof of your mouth slopes off behind the ridged area into the cavity of your palate. It is just before the slope that your tongue should rest–in the most defined “ridge.” This is called “the spot.”

The second exercise helps you find where the back of your tongue should rest. Start by making a big, cheezy grin and raising your eyebrows. Now, try to swallow while keeping your teeth clenched. This may be difficult, but if you can do it successfully, you will feel the back of your tongue pressing against the roof of your mouth–This is where you want it to be.

To see results from both of these exercises, practice them several times throughout the day. If you do so, you should start to notice your muscle memory kicking-in and your tongue rising to the correct position naturally!

Now that you know what tongue positioning is and how to use it to improve significant parts of your overall health and well-being, what are you going to do about it? We hope that you use these exercises and get started on your way looking, feeling, breathing and sleeping better. If you are experiencing some of the signs and symptoms we mention above and would like to speak with a local dentist about tongue positioning, please contact Dr. Owen Mandanas. Dr. Mandanas will take a holistic approach to your healthcare, considering the whole body and how each part interacts with the others for your well-being.

Natural Remedies for Dry Sockets

Natural Remedies for Dry Sockets

Two days after your tooth extraction, you begin to experience excruciating, throbbing pain. Perhaps it extends to the ear and the eye on the extraction side of your face. Bad news. You probably have a dry socket.

Dry sockets occur when a blood clot either does not form after a tooth extraction or is lost. When this happens, the jawbone and nerves that were protected by the blood clot become exposed, causing significant pain and delayed healing. Good news. There are natural remedies for dry sockets that can relieve your pain within minutes to hours.

Clove Oil – Clove oil is used by dentists in so many applications that the smell of clove oil is often what patients identify as the smell of a dental office. Why is clove oil used so frequently in the dental field? Because it has antiseptic properties that fight bacteria in the mouth. These properties can be harnessed to treat a dry socket. Simply rinse the socket gently with warm salt water to clean it then apply a clove oil dressing, made by rolling a piece of cotton or gauze into a ball and adding a drop of clove oil. The ball should be small enough to fit in the socket without compacting but big enough to prevent food from entering it. Replace the ball every 24 hours until the pain is relieved. This process can take up to 5 days, but some relief can be expected within minutes to an hour.

Salt Water – Stir 1/2 teaspoon of salt into an 8 oz glass of warm water until the salt dissolves. Warm water can reduce swelling while salt can prevent infection. It is good to rinse gently with this solution 24 hours after a tooth extraction to prevent dry sockets. If you already have dry sockets, rinse gently with the solution 2-3 times per day to see results.

Cold Compress – A cold compress can be made using an ice pack purchased from the store, ice cubes and a towel, or a towel soaked in cold water. What is important is that the cold object is applied to the wounded area with pressure. Hold the compress to the side of the face that is affected for 15 minutes, 4-5 times per day to reduce swelling.

Honey – Honey is a natural antibacterial. Some studies report that honey can sterilize dry sockets within 3-6 days. Make a honey dressing in the same way that you would make a clove oil dressing, only by dipping the cotton or gauze ball into the honey with a pair of tweezers.

Black Tea – Black tea is a natural antibiotic, capable of reducing pain and swelling. Place a black tea bag in hot water as you would to make tea. Once the tea is sufficiently brewed, remove the tea bag and let it cool. Once cool, place the tea bag on the dry socket and hold it there for 5-10 minutes. Afterward, use the tea you made to rinse your mouth.

Apple Cider Vinegar – Apple cider vinegar is antibacterial and anti-inflammatory, preventing infections. To make an apple cider vinegar dressing, dip a cotton ball in the vinegar and place it on the dry socket, holding it there for 10 minutes, 2 times per day.

Garlic – As unpleasant as it may sound, garlic is another natural antibiotic and anti-inflammatory, good for treating dry sockets. Make a paste using garlic cloves and a little salt. Apply the paste to the socket for 30 minutes before removing and rinsing with warm water.

Turmeric – Turmeric is a natural pain reliever and anti-inflammatory. Mix 1/2 teaspoon of turmeric with a little water to make a paste and apply it to the dry socket. After 20 minutes, rinse the area with warm water. Do this 2-3 times per day.

Valerian Root – Valerian root is capable of alleviating the sensitivity of the nervous system. Make a tea by placing a piece of the root in boiling water for 10-15 minutes. Sip the tea 2 times per day.

Tea Tree Oil – Tea tree oil is a natural antiseptic that can heal dry sockets. Dip a cotton swab in water then place 1-2 drops of tea tree oil on it. Press this against the dry socket for 5 minutes, then rinse with warm water. Do this 2-3 times per day.

Now that you know some of the natural remedies for dry sockets, which will you choose? For more natural ways to take care of your teeth after dry sockets, read Natural Ways to Improve Teeth Health.

Why Healthy Gums Are Important

Why Healthy Gums Are Important

We all know the drill. “Brush your teeth twice a day and don’t forget to floss!” Dentists around the world have played this tape for years, searing into our minds the importance of oral hygiene. But do we really believe in it? Big words like gingivitis (gum inflammation) and periodontitis (gum disease) may sound scary, but what are the real consequences of unhealthy gums? Gum health can have repercussions for not just the mouth, but the whole body as well.

Gingivitis to Periodontitis (gum disease)

Say you’ve slacked on your dental duties. Noticeable plaque has begun to build in a couple problem areas on your teeth. Remember that plaque is an invisible, sticky, bacteria-laden film that can harden to your teeth and become tarter, a cement-like material that is difficult to remove. Needless to say, your gums are not happy with their new bacteria neighbors. Here are some signs that you may have Gingivitis:

  • Gums are red, swollen (inflamed), tender, and subject to bleeding
  • Gums are receding from the teeth
  • A pocket has developed between the teeth and the gums
  • Chronic bad breath, often accompanied by a bad taste in the mouth

Gingivitis can progress to Periodontitis (gum disease) if it is not taken care of. Periodontitis is much more serious, putting you at risk of severely damaging or in some cases losing your teeth as supportive bone and tissue become affected. Periodontitis may be present in your mouth if:

  • Pus has developed between the teeth and gums
  • Teeth are loosening
  • Your bite has changed
  • Chewing has become painful

Treating Gingivitis can be as easy as getting a thorough cleaning from your dentist and recommitting to a regular brush and floss routine. Treating Periodontitis requires a deeper cleaning process called scaling and root planing. Scaling involves removing tarter below the gum line, which can sometimes require the use of a laser or ultrasonic device. Root planing smoothes the rough spots of the teeth so that the gums have a place to adhere. Medications such as gels, rinses, and oral antibiotics may be used to keep bacteria at bay. In advanced cases of Periodontitis, surgery may be required.

Bacteria in the Body

The bacteria that cause gum disease can damage more than just your teeth. Research is suggesting that this bacteria may enter the bloodstream through the gums, impacting the heart, lungs, and other parts of the body as well. More research needs to be done to confirm the correlation, but gum disease has been linked to the following health issues:

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Coronary Artery Disease
  • Diabetes
  • Respiratory Infection/Disease
  • Rheumatoid Arthritis
  • Stroke

Gum disease can get complicated. Tooth loss is not out of the question for untreated Periodontitis, which has ramifications for lifestyle and appearance. Health complications like Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes, and Stroke can be life-altering. Why not alter your lifestyle instead and keep up on your dental hygiene? If you think your mouth may show signs of gum disease, talk to your local holistic dentist. She can discuss treatment options with you and provide you with best practices for healthy gums that involve more than just “brush and floss.”


Benefits of Natural Toothpaste

The Benefits of Natural Toothpaste

Natural toothpaste is becoming more and more popular for good reason. Your gums absorb whatever ingredients you put into your mouth. That means both the good things and the bad like chemicals in toothpastes and mouthwashes, get connected directly to your whole body through your gums. Therefore, having healthy gums and a healthy mouth is one of the best ways to contribute to your overall physical health. With that in mind, doesn’t it make sense to use the healthiest products out there for your teeth?

Check the labels on your tooth products.

Many common toothpastes and mouthwashes contain elements that are harmful to us in various ways.

  • Most of us have been convinced that we need fluoride in our water and our toothpaste. Most of us are already getting enough in our water (even for children) that we don’t need more in our toothpaste.
  • Sodium Laurel Sulfate (SLS) is used to make toothpaste foam, but believe it or not, it is a detergent. A detergent you’ll find in most shampoos and is a skin irritant for many people. The foaming isn’t something you need; it’s just something we’ve come to expect.
  • Saccharin is a common sweetener in many types of mouthwash and toothpastes but not used in foods due to it causing kidney cancer in lab rats. Many people feel it’s not a big deal because you aren’t eating it. However, since your gums absorb so much, it can be serious.

Benefits of Natural Toothpastes

Most of the benefits of brushing your teeth come from the actual act of brushing, even if you are only using water. It is the bacteria in your mouth that can cause gingivitis and other dental issues. Natural toothpastes can eliminate the bacteria in your mouth naturally with out using harmful chemicals.

Natural toothpastes use natural ingredients like mint and other herbs to freshen your breath. They are free of artificial flavoring and dyes. Many natural toothpastes use natural ingredients like hydrated silica to whiten teeth, which is gentler on your teeth than artificial bleaching agents found in common toothpastes.

Your mouth, your teeth, your gums are a very important part of your overall health. Invest in yourself and try different natural tooth pastes until you find one you like.

Holistic dentistry in Anchorage, Alaska

Why is Holistic Dentistry Important?

More people are adopting the holistic approach to better health and wellness. Dentistry is one particular field where many practitioners have chosen to use holistic methods.

Of course, holistic dentistry can and is often misinterpreted and misunderstood when compared to “traditional” dentistry. Many times, it is perceived that “holistic” dentistry and “traditional” dentistry are two completely different, mutually exclusive practices and that any given practitioner MUST be one or other. So before we start exploring the value of holistic dentistry, it is extremely crucial to remember: every dentist is different. He or she can borrow from both holistic and traditional schools of thought. Now that we’ve got that out of the way let’s explore what makes holistic dentistry so special!


The term “holistic” is a reference to “the whole.” So holistic dentistry doesn’t just address your teeth and mouth – it addresses factors that have implications for your entire health and well-being. A holistic dentist will focus on educating their patients on how dentistry plays a major role in their overall health. For example, did you know your dental and oral health can have a direct effect on sleep apnea (and vice versa)? In fact, some dentists even offer things like Ortho-Tain to help resolve sleep apnea issues! General health concerns are completely in considered when you visit a holistically oriented dentist.



Another benefit of holistic dentistry is that practitioners pay very close attention to the effects their dental appliances and materials will have on your overall health. Here are some examples:

  • Holistic dentists tend to avoid things like mercury amalgam fillings. Mercury, of course, is poisonous to our bodies. Even the smallest amounts will put your overall health at great risk. As a metal, mercury fillings can also put extreme pressure on your tooth and as a result, will last longer than the tooth itself.
  • Root canals are addressed with extreme caution and attention to detail, as holistic dentists understand that 100% sterilization of the canal is difficult to achieve. Also, some sterilization chemicals in fact toxic, such as formaldehyde. Leftover bacteria in the canal can also lead to things like breast cancer and heart disease. Many holistic dentists will instead recommend the total extraction of the tooth, but would prefer to provide detailed insights towards preventing symptoms in the first place.
  • Holistic dentists prefer topical fluoride is favored over ingested fluoride. Ingested fluoride can cause health defects like cancer and bone damage, and research has shown that it has no real benefit to your teeth.

Take the time to ask what your local holistic dentist can do for you and your family. You may find that as you utilize this form of care for your mouth and teeth, your overall health will improve as well, leading to a happier, healthier life!

What are the Pros & Cons of Dentures in Anchorage?

What are the Pros and Cons of Dentures in Anchorage?

Dentures have long been an affordable and practical method for improving the quality of your smile, your ability to eat a variety of foods, and even your self-confidence. Unfortunately, many people recoil at the idea, envisioning the set of teeth floating in a glass of water next to the bed. Dentures have come a long way in recent years and are worth a second look for anyone struggling with missing or decayed teeth.

Types of Dentures

There are four main types of dentures, and your Anchorage dentist can help you determine which one is best depending on your specific needs.

  1. Conventional or complete dentures are fully removable and are usually the ones people think of when they envision the teeth in the glass of water. With this style, you will usually have any remaining teeth removed, and your dentures will be fitted once your jaw and tissues have healed.
  2. Partial dentures fill in the spaces where you might have missing teeth. You must have some teeth that are in good working order that stay in your mouth for partial dentures to work.
  3. Overdentures utilize some remaining teeth as anchors, but the dentures still fit over everything, giving you a uniform, beautiful smile.
  4. Immediate dentures are removable and are ones you can wear out of the dentist’s office on the same day your old teeth are removed. This is nice because you won’t have to be without teeth while your gums heal, but immediate dentures often need to be remade once the healing is finished.

Pros of Getting Dentures

  1. Modern dentures are more comfortable than earlier models and look more natural.
  2. Dentures make speaking easier.
  3. Dentures make eating easier.
  4. Dentures give you a beautiful smile.
  5. Dentures can support your facial muscles, providing a more youthful appearance.

Cons of Getting Dentures

  1. Getting the right type of dentures for you is a process that requires multiple trips to the dentist and possible tooth removal.
  2. You will need to get used to them. They can feel a little weird at first and may even cause some soreness. You may need to learn how to pronounce some sounds differently with dentures.
  3. Eating with dentures takes some practice.
  4. Dentures are fragile when not in your mouth, and you will need to take care of them.
  5. Dentures do wear out about every five years and need to be replaced.

Depending on why you are considering getting dentures, the con list may seem like minor inconveniences to you. If you still have questions and would like to talk to someone, please give us a call to set up a consultation. We would love to chat about your many options.

Anchorage sedation dentistry safe and comfortable way to visit the dentist

Overcome Your Fear of the Dentist: The Benefits of Sedation Dentistry

If the very idea of going to the dentist feels you with fear and anxiety, you are not alone. Colgate estimates about 30-40 million people choose to suffer from tooth or mouth pain rather than face going to the dentist. Sedation dentistry is available in Anchorage and offers a safe, comfortable way to take care of your teeth.

What is Sedation Dentistry?

In sedation dentistry, medicine is used to relax you during your dental procedure. It can be a part of even the simplest procedures as well as the complicated or time-consuming. There are four standard levels of sedation:

  • Minimal sedation– you stay awake but are very relaxed.
  • Moderate sedation– you are awake, but won’t remember much of the experience, and you’ll probably slur your words.
  • Deep sedation– you are hovering on the edge of being conscious but still awake. You likely won’t remember anything at all about the procedure.
  • General anesthesia– usually used for complex surgical procedures and for extreme phobia suffers. You will be completely unconscious.

Who Can Benefit from Sedation Dentistry?

  • People with a phobia about dentists
  • If you have a low pain threshold
  • Those who struggle to sit still in the dentist’s chair
  • If you have very sensitive teeth
  • If you have an overactive gag reflex
  • People who need a significant amount of dental work done

What are the Benefits of Sedation Dentistry?

  • The dentist will be able to get the work done faster since you will be relaxed enough to not move around much if at all.
  • You can relax knowing you won’t be filling any fear or anxiety during the procedure. You can even take a pill about an hour before that can help you relax prior to arriving at the dentist.
  • Depending on the level of sedation you will fill little to no pain during the procedure due to the medication. Often your dentist will still use topical anesthesia where they are working.
  • You’ll be memory free! Especially if you have past memories of a horrible dental experience, you probably don’t want to remember this one. Especially if you go with deep sedation or general anesthesia, you will have no memories of the work that was done, just the benefits of your dentist’s handiwork.

Don’t let your fear of the dentist keep you in pain or put the health of your teeth at risk. There are options! Sedation dentistry is available in Anchorage and we can help you have the best experience possible.

Little boy sleeping. Ortho-Tain is a safe treatment for Sleep Apnea in children

Ortho-Tain Safely Treats Sleep Apnea in Kids

Sleep Apnea is a sleep disorder in which a person repeatedly stops breathing and then starts again. While it is more common in adult males, children can also suffer from it as well. In fact, more and more studies seem to link intention, bad behavior, ADD and ADHD with a lack of sleep and poor sleep quality in children. Ortho-Tain can help Anchorage children get better sleep and improve their quality of life.

What is Ortho-Tain?

Ortho-Tain is a removable orthodontic appliance that can not only be worn by teens and adults but also by children as young as five. The appliance is custom made to fit your teeth and can be worn during the evening as well as during the day. For many people, it is a safe, efficient and affordable alternative to traditional braces.

In addition to offering an alternative to traditional sleep apnea treatments, Ortho-Tain can treat a variety of conditions including overbite, overjet or buckteeth, spacing issues, crowding, TMJ disorders, and malocclusion.

How Does Ortho-Tain Help with Sleep Apnea in Children?

Ortho-Tain offers two appliances, the Nite-Guide and the Occlus-o-Guide, that can make a dramatic impact on the quality of your child’s sleep. Originally, both appliances were designed to straighten teeth, and they still do a very effective job at that. In additional they have been found to promote the healthy downward and outward growth and development of both the upper and lower jaw. This is critical because sleep problems like sleep apnea come from kids not getting enough oxygen while they sleep. When their upper and lower jaw has developed correctly, then their airways can expand fully providing for more oxygen and better sleep quality. The Nite-Guide and the Occlus-0-Guide are both appliances worn while sleeping and can also eliminate teeth grinding and reduce snoring.

Early diagnosis and orthodontic treatment in children as young as 5 is not something most parents traditionally consider. However, some Anchorage dentists are hoping to change that mindset. Early treatment tends to be less invasive and shorter in duration. This has many obvious benefits for both child and parents including:

  • Better sleep earlier in a child’s life can reduce or eliminate issues like anxiety, moodiness, hyperactivity, sleep apnea, ADHD, etc.
  • Shorter treatment times
  • Lower costs
  • Reduction or elimination of more traditional braces later in a child’s teens, which tend to be more expensive, invasive, and painful
  • Early treatment can catch and treat medical conditions like TMJ and stop it before it develops.

Sleep apnea can be a contributing factor if your child is suffering from behavioral issues or even just struggling to pay attention. Ortho-Tain is an option that is less invasive and expensive than traditional sleep apnea treatments and can address teeth issues in addition to the sleep problems.

man snoring, 4 common myths about sleep apnea in Anchorage

4 Common Sleep Apnea Myths

Sleep disorders are a common topic in Anchorage due to our issues with too much or too little light. Sleep Apnea or Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) doesn’t have anything to do with light, but it is a sleep disorder that we are becoming more and more aware of these days. As with most topics that increase in popularity a lot of myths get mixed in with the facts. Today we are going to clear up some of the common misconceptions about sleep apnea.

Sleep apnea isn’t dangerous.

Sleep deprivation caused by sleep apnea is a very real and hazardous thing. A study by the Harvard School of Public Health revealed that truck drivers suffering from untreated sleep apnea were five times more likely to get into an accident. This means that unfortunately, the consequences of this sleep disorder can affect more people than just the person dealing with it. Additionally, the health risks for the person with sleep apnea are also dangerous. If left untreated, it can increase the possibility of heart attack, stroke, obesity, high blood pressure, and even diabetes.

Sleep apnea and snoring are the same thing, right?

Snoring and sleep apnea are both are caused by the blocking of the respiratory tract. But that is where the similarities end. Snoring can be loud and disruptive, but that is usually the extent of it. However, the blockage that causes snoring could get so severe that it causes the sufferer to stop breathing up to hundreds of times each night. This is why loud and persistent snoring is usually an indicator that someone should get tested for sleep apnea.

I’m still young, so I’m not at risk for sleep apnea.

Men who are over the age of 40 and obese tend to be at the highest risk for sleep apnea. However, anyone can have it. Some in the medical industry speculate that the rise of sleep apnea in children could be due to the increasing number of obese kids. A growing number of dental specialists believe that sleep apnea stems from incorrect jaw growth as well as facial development during childhood.

I’ll need surgery to correct sleep apnea.

Outside of some very extreme cases, most people will not need surgery to correct their sleep apnea. One of the most common non-surgical treatments for sleep apnea is the CPAP or continuous positive airway pressure machine. A CPAP device gently blows the right amount of air directly into your airways to keep them open during the night. Another route is the orthodontic approach in which your dentist or orthodontist fits you with Othro-Tain or Myobrace appliances. Using the appliances, and with some time, some of the oral-facial issues can be corrected, thus solving or minimizing the sleep apnea problem.

Sleep apnea is a sleeping disorder that can greatly affect your life or the life of a loved one. There are great options out there for treatment, so it is worth giving a specialist a call to get diagnosed and to explore all of the treatments available.